Olamide, 16

I was so excited by the fact that I was going to go watch POT because I know that my friend Malachai’s brother (Miles) is a good actor. I arrived a bit late, so I missed around 15 minutes of the production and when I say this theatre was packed, I mean it was PACKED. The audience actually spiked my interest as the majority of them were Black, while many others were Asian. Normally, when we go to watch plays with school, the theatre is filled with a bunch of Caucasian people who are at the peak of their age, so this was something different. Anyway, the thing I loved the most about the production was the fact that there was no set change, which made the plot harder to follow. As I was watching it, a lot of questions were popping up in my head; Why can’t Josh hear Louisa? Is Miles a guardian angel? Why can’t Louisa leave? Is she probably dead? The plot literally had the maddest twist; as soon as we realised that Louisa was in a coma the bomb dropped and, in the theatre, you could tell that everyone got the answers to all the questions that we all had in our heads. There was a sense of understanding that floated above all our heads.

“ Normally, when we go to watch plays with school, the theatre is filled with a bunch of Caucasian people who are at the peak of their age, so this was something different.”

I think that the name of the play emphasises how the whole production took place within one set, which did not change in any shape or form. The characters were literally in a pot, and when the pot lid is bubbling up and down that is when Louisa was getting heated trying to leave but not being able to. That struggle was expressed deeply through the set choice. I’d definitely recommend this production to every soul in our generation. It was an eye opener and it actually made me emotional, because these are things that happen behind closed doors, shown from a female’s perspective, which is actually quite different.